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P.R. FOOD

 

TROPICAL FRUITS
& VEGETABLES    

Tropical Fruits

Bananas, pineapple, papaya (lechoza), avocados, mangos, soursop (guanábanas), passion fruits (parchas),  pomegranate (granada), coconut,  oranges, etc. 


 Reference:  photo provided  by Aurye from a Greeting Card

 

Sugar Field (Central Azucarera) 

This was a Sugar Field many years ago, when Puerto Rico used to plant sugar cane.


Reference: 
http://www.carts.org/artist_rosa3.html


Pineapples


Reference: 
http://prboriken.com/food.htm


Green Banana Plant (Mata de guineos)


Reference:  photo by Aurye from my oldest sister backyard in Trujillo Alto, Puerto Rico.

 

Cooffee Plant

(Before being processed)


Reference:  photo took from a Calendar



Coconut (Coco)



Reference:  http://www.ricansrecipes.com/recipes/detail.php?category_id=11&id=50

Tanarind
(Tamarindo)


Reference:  http://www.map-puerto-rico.com/fruits-in-puerto-rico.html

Tamarindo is native to tropical Africa and grows wild throughout the island. The fruit is sweet, acidic and tart like citrus. Some people use it as a laxative.
Reference: 
http://www.map-puerto-rico.com/fruits-in-puerto-rico.html

Anon


Reference:  http://www.map-puerto-rico.com/fruits-in-puerto-rico.html

Anon (sugar apple) is a sweet pulpy tropical fruit with thick scaly rind and shiny black seeds that grows from 10 to 20 ft in height with open crown of irregular branches, and some-what zigzag twigs.
Reference: 
http://www.map-puerto-rico.com/fruits-in-puerto-rico.html

Grosella
(Otaheite gooseberry)


Reference:  http://www.map-puerto-rico.com/fruits-in-puerto-rico.html

Grosella (Otaheite gooseberry) or also know as gooseberry tree, despite its name, the plant does not resemble the gooseberry, except for the acidity of its fruits. This hard to find tree can grow from 10 to 30 feet tall. Its fruit is really acid and it's better prepared on "Dulce de Grosella", very good sweet dessert.
Reference: 
http://www.map-puerto-rico.com/fruits-in-puerto-rico.html

Pajuil


Reference: 
http://www.map-puerto-rico.com/fruits-in-puerto-rico.html

Pajuil is a large pulpy and juicy that has a fine sweet flavor and is commonly referred to as the "cashew fruit" or the "cashew apple."
Reference: 
http://www.map-puerto-rico.com/fruits-in-puerto-rico.html

 

Melicoccus bijugatus
“Quenepas"


Reference:
http://en.wikipedia.org

Melicoccus bijugatus, commonly called Spanish lime, genip, genipe, quenepa, mamoncillo, or honeyberry, is a fruit-bearing tree in the soapberry family Sapindaceae, native or naturalised over a wide area of the tropics, including South and Central America, Mexico, the Caribbean, and parts of Africa and the Pacific.
Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org


Guavas
"Guayabas"


Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org

Guavas are plants in the myrtle family (Myrtaceae) genus Psidium (meaning "pomegranate" in Latin), which contains about 100 species of tropical shrubs and small trees. They are native to Mexico, Central America, and northern South America. Guavas are now cultivated and naturalized throughout the tropics and subtropics in Southeast Asia, Hawaii, the Caribbean, Florida and Africa.
Reference:  http://en.wikipedia.org


 

 


TRADITIONAL CHRISTMAS DINNER
&  DRINKS


Rotisserie Pork (Lechón asado)


Reference:  photo by Aurye from a  fast food restaurant (Lechonera) in Guavate, Puerto Rico.
 

Blood Sausage (Morcillas)
(Stuff with the pork blood and white rice) 


Reference:  photo by Aurye from a fast food restaurant (Lechonera) in Guavate, Puerto Rico.

 

Coquito (Our traditional Christmas drink)

Made of of a mix of coconut milk, cream of coconut, evaporated milk, condensed milk, eggnog, ground cinnamon, cloves, vanilla extract and white rum.  We usually drink it at Christmas time.


Reference: 
http://www.ricanrecipes.com/recipes/detail.php?category_id=11&id=50

 

Typical Christmas Dinner

(Típica Cena de Navidad)

Our typical dinner for Christmas Eve includes rice with green pegeons peas (arroz con gandúles), "pasteles", rotisserie pork (perníl de cerdo asado), blood sausage (morcillas), accompanied by our typical dessert rice puddin (arroz con dulce) and our christmas typical drink, "coquito" made with a mix of coconut milk, eggnog and rum


Reference:  http://cgi.ebay.com/Puerto-Rican-PASTELES-MACHINE-food-from-Puerto-Rico

 

These vegetables are used to make our delicious "Pasteles" in Christmas. 


Reference:   http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/5217/pasteles.htm


Puerto Rican savory cakes (in banana leaves) 


Reference:  http://www.whats4eats.com/recipes/r_st_pasteles.html

Rice with green pegeons peas
(Arroz con Gandúles)

 On Christmas time we eat rice with green pigeons peas (arroz con gandúles), blood sausages (morcillas), rotisserie pork (lechón o pernil asado), dumpling (pasteles) made with ground green bananas, yautías, yuca, calabaza and green plantain stuffed with pork meat, and other seasonings then wrapped with a special paper or green banana leaves.  Some people use chicken meat instead of pork.  The rice with green pigeon peas is one of our  favorite christmas typical food . 


Reference: 
http://www.houseofpuertorico.com

 Rice with green pigeons peas (Arroz con Gandúles), Puerto Rican savory cakes (Pasteles) and salad.


Reference:  http://www.houseofpuertorico.com

Rice Pudding
(Arroz con Dulce)



Reference: http://www.flickr.com

Puertorican "arroz con dulce" (a firm and sweet rice pudding dessert), traditionaly served at the Christmas dinner, (Arroz con dulce puertorriqueño, típico postre de las fiestas navideñas).
Reference: http://www.flickr.com

 

The Sirajo Goby
(Cetí of Puerto Rico)


Reference: http://www.stripersonline.com

The Sirajo Goby
(Cetí of Puerto Rico)

You could make a turnover with this kind of fish, it is a very delicious plate in the City of Arecibo, Puerto Rico

General Information:

Caribbean river fish dominate Pums within the Caribbean National forest. Some of the species mature and reproduce i erto Rico’s lower river systems, however, some species occur in steep mountain strean the upper sections of the forest’s rivers, but the larvae then move downstream, out ofthe forest boundaries to the estuarine or marine waters adjacent to the coastal plain. Juveniles must then migrate back up-stream to mature and reproduce as the process repeats itself.

Description:

The Sirajo Goby is a small (3 to 4 inches/7.6 to 10 centimeters), silvery colored with horizontal stripes circling its body from gill to tail. The mail Sirajo becomes a beautiful, iridescent blue color at mating. It has a modified ventral fin which is used for moving up and down wetted surfaces.

Habits:

The Sirajo Goby feeds by scraping algae off rocks in forest streams. It is capable of moving up vertical surfaces with the sucker formed by its modified ventral fins. Using this "sucker" it can move easily up vertical wetted surfaces. The larvae of this goby are fished by the thousands as they migrate back into the rivers. They are considered a delicacy by locals.

Habitat:

Forest rivers and streams.
Reference:
http://www.stripersonline.com

 FRIED FAST FOOD

Fried Fast Food
(Alcapurrias  y Bacalaítos Fritos)



Reference: 
www.jíbaros.com

 

A man frying Bacalaítos and Alcapurrias at Piñones, Isla Verde


Reference:  Photo provided by Aurye



Fried Green Plantains 
(Tostones)


Reference: 
www.houseofpuertorico.com


Bacalaítos Fritos


Reference: 
www.houseofpuertorico.com

 

Carne  Al Picnho (Shishkabob Puertorican style)

Bolas de Mofongo


Reference:
http://www.flickr.com

Puertorican mofongo balls - mashed fried green plantains - with bacon and garlic over seasoned chicken broth. (Mofongo puertorriqueño - plátanos verdes fritos y majados - con tocino sobre caldo de pollo sazonado).
Reference:
http://www.flickr.com

Arañitas


Reference:  http://www.elboricua.com

Arañitas

3 green plantains
2 teaspoons crushed garlic or powder
salt and pepper to taste
oil for frying

Shred the peeled plantains. Combine the shredded plantain, garlic, salt and pepper. Drop by tablespoons into hot oil. Fry until crispy turning over once. Drain on paper towels. A great snack!
Reference:  http://www.elboricua.com


 

 


ICE CREAM  (HELADO)
PIROGUE  (PIRAGUA)

Heladería Lares


Reference:  http://www.puertoricodaytrips.com


Reference:  http://www.puertoricodaytrips.com


Reference:  http://www.puertoricodaytrips.com

I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream! If you love ice cream (helado in Spanish) , or just want to taste some exotic flavors, I have a place for you to go.  Heladeria Lares is an ice cream shop in Lares that has 45-50 delicious flavors of ice creams daily — many very unusual.  The ice cream shop (heladeria in Spanish) is located right on the town square in Lares, just across the street from the Church. This narrow shop was opened in 1968 by Salvador Barreto ("Yinyo"). Today, the shop is operated by the same family, and they still make the same delicious and unusual flavors using Yinyo’s original recipes.

The ice cream is all home made. The flavors range from traditional ones you know and love (like cookies & cream, vanilla or chocolate) to "exotic" ones that you’d never have imagined (like cod fish, rice & beans or garlic) to some other in-between flavors (like carrot, sweet potato or corn). The names of the ice creams flavors are in Spanish, but the scooper will translate them for you.  They give out 2 free samples for you to try before making a decision. I think that choosing was the hardest part! I like ice cream, so I wanted something that would taste good, but be slightly unusual (but not too gross).

We each tried a couple different flavors before making our final decisions. Ray tasted the rice & beans — it wasn’t sweet enough for his taste — and calabaza (pumpkin) — which he said was bland. He choose arroz con dulce (rice pudding flavor) and corn — both of which are their most popular flavors. I tasted the calabaza & batata (pumpkin/sweet potato) combination and ajonjoli (sesame seed) — which was good. I choose the calabaza & batada combination — which I liked — and almond cake. We each got 2 scoops in a dish. It was a yummy treat!  Prices were reasonable. You can get your ice cream in a cup or cone. About $3 for 2 scoops.
Referemce: 
http://www.puertoricodaytrips.com

 

PIROGUE
(PIRAGUA)

Reference:  http://en.wikipedia.org
 


Reference:  http://en.wikipedia.org

A piragua  is a Puerto Rican frozen treat, shaped like a pyramid, made of shaved ice and covered with fruit flavored syrup which are sold by vendors, known as piragüeros, in small colorful pushcarts. Piraguas are not only sold in Puerto Rico; they can be found in the United States in areas such as New York where there is a large Puerto Rican community.  In most Spanish-speaking countries, the word piragua means pirogue, a small, flat-bottomed boat.  In Puerto Rico the word piragua refers to a frozen treat made of shaved ice and covered with fruit flavored syrup. Unlike the American snow cone which is round and resembles a snowball, the piragua is pointy and shaped like a pyramid.  The word piragua is derived from the combination of the Spanish words "Pirámide" (pyramid) and "Agua" (water).   In Latin America, frozen treats similar to the piragua are known by many different names.

The piragua vendor is known as the "Piragüero". Most Piragüeros sell their product from a colorful wooden pushcart that carries an umbrella, instead of from a fixed stand or kiosk. The Piragüero makes the treats from shavings off a block of solid ice inside his cart  and mixtures of fruit-flavored syrups.  The tropical syrup flavors vary from lemon and strawberry to passion fruit and guava. Once the syrups are ready, the Piragüero will go to his place of business, which in Puerto Rico is usually close to the town plaza, while in the United States it is usually close to the public parks near Hispanic neighborhoods, to sell his product.  In the process of preparing a piragua, the piragüero shaves the ice from the block of ice with a Hand Ice Shaver.  He then puts the shaved ice into a cup and uses a funnel shaped tool to give it the distinctive pyramid shape. The Piragüero finishes making the piragua after he pours the desired flavored syrup. Unlike the typical American snow cone, which is often eaten with a spoon, the piragua is eaten straight out of the cup or is sipped through a straw.  Piragüeros are only out on hot sunny days because those are the only days when they can expect good business.

The Puerto Rican piragua has been the subject of paintings and a book. The painting "Carrito de Piraguas" ("Piragua Cart") is a mixed media piece by an unknown artist, on exhibit at El Museo del Barrio in New York.  Puerto Rican artist Iván Moura Limardo created various paintings related to the Piragua, among them are "Piragüero 5" and "Piragüero 10" which are on display in the Siena Art Gallery in San Juan.  The town of Coamo commissioned the creation of a monument in the honor of the Piragüeros. The statue which is called "Monumento al Piragüero" is located in the town plaza.
 Reference:  http://en.wikipedia.org