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ART & CULTURE

ART  &  EVENTS:


TIBES, PONCE, PR



Here Mr. Francisco Rivera Marrero (FRIMA) at the Exposition of his book "Cocotí" (a legend of a child to the rescue of the Taino roots).





JUANA DIAZ, PR


Mr. Rivera (FRIMA) in one of his paints called "Amanecer de Reyes Boricua" at the Festival de Reyes in Juana Díaz, PR in our real religious tradition of the Three Kings.
 

 



ARTS


FILIBERTO OJEDA


Note:  "I am not a Politic, thank God",  Mr. Rivera said.
As an Artist Mr. Rivera (FRIMA) retrieve the people feelings and created this canvas.  Some people say it was an abuse because he was a patriot, others that he was in prison or that he was a fugitive, but he want you to understand that as an Artist he saw, that justice or injustice, something historic made this moment a special moment, the day it was killed or the day it was immortalized he saw that and that's why he drew it.



 

As you could appreciate it, here are some of his most recent arts.  If you are interested in one of his paints you can contact him at
(787) 406-4213.  You can also choose the frame of your choice.  The words and ribbons on each picture are only for copy right
purposes.




   


   

           




 










 















WALLPAPERS
(MURALES)




SAN PATRICIO PLAZA
 

The famous Puerto Rican painter, Mr. Francisco Rivera Marrero (FRIMA), will carry an exhibition of his most recent arts during the whole month of August, 2006 at San Patricio Plaza, Buchanan, Puerto Rico.  The Masterpiece will be "Tropical Flame", based on the original paint "Flaming June" from the painter Sir Lord Leighton.  For more information about this important event, you can call Mr. Rivera at (787) 406-4213.

 



ORLANDO, FLORIDA

The "First Bobbin Lace Festival" (Festival del Mundillo) will take place in Orlando, Florida in October 15, 2006.   The Bobbin Lace (Mundillo) is a kind of craft that came from Spain to Puerto Rico and still been used to make shirts, dresses, handkerchiefs, table cloths and more.   A group of Artisans from Puerto Rico will be gladly to welcome you to this fantastic event.  Mr. Francisco Rivera Marrero, well known as FRIMA, will also be there in his exceptional role of "Moriviví", with "Los Cuentos de mi Abuelo" and will be exposing his lithography and some of his paints.  Don't miss the oportunity to see him in this important event.

Mr. Francisco Rivera Marrero in his role as "Moriviví" in "Los Cuentos de mi Abuelo".




Reference:  photo provided by Mr. Francisco Rivera Marrero (FRIMA)

 

 Mr. Francisco Rivera Marrero in his role of "Moriviví" as a "jíbaro boricua".

 


Reference:  photo provided by Mr. Francisco Rivera Marrero (FRIMA)

FESTIVALS (CARNAVALES)

The Puerto Ricans celebrate Festivals (Festivales y/o Carnavales) in all the towns of the island.  They used colorful dresses and masks, and they singing  and dance our typical music, the plena and the bomba, in our streets.  We celebrate this festivals as a religious tradition in an offering to a Patron Saint of each town.  The most important are San Sebastian Street Festival (Festival de la Calle San Sebastián)  in old San Juan and the Loíza Aldea Festival (Carnaval de Loíza Aldea).  Another one is the Festival in Ponce, Puerto Rico, one of the towns  where our "Plena"  music was born.

San Sebastian Street Festival (Festival Calle San Sebastián)
In the Old San Juan, PR (En el Viejo San Juan, PR)

 


Reference:  photo provided by Aurye

 

This is the Loíza Aldea Festival (Carnaval de Loíza Aldea)
in Loíza, P.R.

 


Reference:  Photo took from a Calendar

This is Ponce Festival (Carnaval de Ponce)
at Ponce, P.R.   



Reference:  Photo took from a Calendar

The Vejigante is such an old character that he is even described in the classic novel Don Quixote written by Miguel de Cervantes in 1605. Today the vejigante have been recreated by Puerto Rican popular tradition as figures of resistance against colonialism and imperialism.  The predominant mask colors, at least traditionally, were black, red and yellow, all symbols of hellfire and damnation. Today, pastels are more likely used. Each vejigante sports at least two or tree horns, although some masks may have hundreds of horns in all shapes and sizes. A carnival is held in Loiza each year, where vejigantes are the main attraction, there are 4 main costumed characters: el Caballero (the knight), los vejigantes, los viejos, (the elders), and las locas (the crazy women).  Mask making in Ponce, the major center for this craft, and in Loíza Aldea, a palm-fringed town on the island's northeastern coast, has since led to a renaissance of Puerto Rican folk art.
Reference:  http://welcome.topuertorico.org/culture/artsc.shtml


The Three Kings

"The Three Kings" (Los Tres Reyes Magos) is our religious tradition. We celebrate Christmas, but the most important thing for us is The  Three Kings, as a commemoration when our Lord was born.  The Puerto Ricans also celebrate the octavas and the octavitas  (after Christmas parties).


Reference:  photo provided by Aurye from a music CD

 


BOBBIN LACE (ENCAJE DE MUNDILLO)



ROSA ELENA EGIPCIACO
Bobbin Lace Artisan (Artesana de Mundillo)




Refence:  http://www.carts.org/artist_rosa2.html

 

In Puerto Rico, the art of "encaje de bolillos" (bobbin lace) is called "mundillo".  This art comes from towns of Moca, Isabela, and Aguadilla in the northwest regions of the island.  Moca, the hometown of Rosa Elena, is considered "la cuna" (the craddle) of "mundillo" (bobbin lace) because for generations women there have produced assigned, promoted, and sold bobbin lace. 

Rosa Elena first started learning "mundillo" at the age of four from her mother.  She had always wanted to learn because she loved the sound of the bobbins clicking against one another as her mother worked on her "mundillo" loom.  From then on, "mundillo" was part of Rosa Elena's life. 

Moca, the hometown of Rosa Elena is considered la cuna (the cradle) of mundillo; for generations it has produced, designed, promoted, and sold bobbin lace.

 

On September 19, 2003, 16 artists received the annual National Heritage Fellowship Award, the highest honor for folk artists in the United States, from the National Endowment for the Arts at a special ceremony in Washington, D.C.  Among tge 2003 Fellos was our CARTS Guest Artist, Rosa Elena Egipciaco, a Puerto Rican bobbin lacemaker (tejedora), who lives in New York.

 

  Moca, the hometown of Rosa Elena is considered la cuna (the cradle) of mundillo; for generations it has produced, designed, promoted, and sold bobbin lace.
Reference:  http://www.carts.org/artist_rosa2.html

 

 


 A purse and glove set Rosa Elena created using claro, brusela, mosca, margarita, cardoneta, and pellisco stitches.

 

 

 


Reference:  www.carts.org/artist_rosa2.html

 

 

 

 

Not only does Rosa Elena create her own patterns but she has also tried to invent new stitches.

 

 

 


"Zurcido-Torcido," Rosa Elena's original design
Photo by Elena Martínez
Reference:  www.carts.org/artist_rosa2.html

 


The Bolillos

 

In bobbin lacemaking, a pillow called a loom holds the pattern and bobbins, forming a workplace for the tejedora (lacemaker). The bolillos (bobbins), pieces of wood about the size of a pencil, are wound with cotton thread. By twisting and crossing the threads stitches form a pattern. Each stitch is made with at least two pairs of bobbing (four threads) and held in place by pins. The pattern is stenciled on graph paper and often made by the tejedora herself. Depending on the pattern, two dozen bobbins or hundreds of bobbins may be used. In addition to its use as edges and borders on clothing, collars for shirts, and handkerchiefs, at one time mundillo was also used to decorate items for special occasions such as wedding dresses, baptismal gowns, and the cloths used to adorn religious icons. It was also once common to give mundillo lace embroidered with romantic inscriptions as a gift to a lover.
Reference:  www.carts.org/artist_rosa2.html


 


  The mundillo loom.    
Photo: Elena Martínez
Reference:  www.carts.org/artist_rosa2.html

 

Bobbin Lace was brought to Puerto Rico from Spain, where it had thrived in major commercial markets as well as a cottage industry in Galicia, Castilla, and Catalonia.  In Spain, lace is called "encaje", because it was worked on separately and then joined to material (the Spanish word for "join" is "encajar"). 

Although lacemaking may have been a cottage industry in Spain, in Puerto Rico, mostly the middle and upper classes - whose daughters could afford the lessons and supplies made lace.
Reference:  www.carts.org/artist_rosa2.html

Bronze Statue of Bobbin Lace Worker 


Bronze statue of a tejadora, mundillo maker. Moca, is the capital of mundillo in Puerto Rico
.
Reference:  www.carts.org/artist_rosa2html



 

Brought to Puerto Rico from Spain

Bobbin Lace was brought to Puerto Rico from Spain, where it had thrived in major commercial markets as well as a cottage industry in Galicia, Castilla, and Catalonia.  In Spain, lace is called "encaje", because it was worked on separately and then joined to material (the Spanish word for "join" is "encajar"). 

Although lacemaking may have been a cottage industry in Spain, in Puerto Rico, mostly the middle and upper classes - whose daughters could afford the lessons and supplies made lace.
Reference: 
http://www.carts.org/artist_rosa2.html